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institutions that contribute to a stable nation state. as an educator i joined the team to oversee the portfolio of education and was given the opportunity to implement the country's education strategic plan over the southwest provinces. additionally i was given the national action plan for women and control of two female engagement teams which were marines trained to interact with the population of women because of the pashi culture, the males were not allowed to interact with the women. in order obviously to ensure communities stay strong you have to not only address the men, but you absolutely need to address the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is act
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
achievements, i have to tell you that what really moves my heart is what you have done for education, for kids in new york city and around the world, the 30 countries you've been to, the school programs you have initiated especially as we do less and less music education in our schools. i want to thank you for that. >> thank you very much. it's a blessing. >> talk to me about this anniversary and the importance of a quarter century of jazz at music center at lincoln center. >> i think we've had the opportunity to work as a community and meet with people all over the world, really, for the purposes of using jazz and the arts to uplift people and bring them together. and the education programs have been so well received. we have about 12 of them that cover kids of all ages from our little infants to jazz in the schools, we're going to be in -- we'll do 120 performances in the new york city public schools alone and we have essentially ellington, a high school jazz band festival and jazz competition we've been doing for 18 years and it's really been a blessing for parents and kids, so pane of our
the european union. despite anti-discrimination laws, they have little access to education or public services in several european countries. >> we need more than just words from the e you. brussels can launch proceedings over treaty violations and holds member states to account this way and other areas, but so far, not over discrimination a menorahs. >> amnesty international nevertheless concludes that the you deserves the nobel peace prize for its peace-building policies over the past six decades. >> the very last issue of the financial times coach lynn hit the stands today with a bit of humor. >> gallows humor, that is. the front page carried the headline "finally in the black" and it was called "the final time storage line." >> but the business side has been no laughing matter. a direct losses every year since it started publication back in 2000. and finally in the black -- an ironic reference to the fact that in its entire 13-year history, "the financial times to richland" never made a profit. >> we did not have a chance to build up our readership over decades. whoever enters the market l
is given the economy of prince george's county, the education level and the demographics of prince george's county, here's the question. is this the best that prince george's county has to offer when it comes to public service? >> i can't believe that it is. on one hand, i just think that people need to step up. and get involved. so that you don't have to make a choice between two individuals like this. >> well, the governor will and can now choose someone else. and mr. hall has indicated he may appeal the decision. >> and that's his right to appeal. >> he also has a right to run. >> he has a right to run for office, should he choose to. >> the brother of former d.c. chair kwame brown, charged with bank fraud. charged with claiming for more income than he earned for a loan modification. that's the same charge that led to kwame brown's resignation as chair after his efforts to buy a boat. this is pretty ironic. >> ironic and unfortunate. >> here again we're talking about public image. although his brother wasn't in public life, but it was related to the brother who was the chair of the d.c
credibility in the work place and then go on. what you're saying is that education, public school education, should teach some of these kids how to do these. >> they used to. 25 years ago, they started -- we bought into the philosophy of everyone has to go to college. not true. someone has to build the college. someone had to build the ceiling. >> we used to call them shop. >> i still have scars right here. >> but if you do go to college, the unemployment rate is only 4's 5% in this country so there's something to be said for getting educated bought you'll work. i agree with you used to be the master and the apprentice and the nave and you worked your way up. and everybody out there knows you got to get a plumber, 25 bucks an hour, right? >> and the faucet leaks you're not going to be calling the geek squad. >> right. you you say there isn't enough training in the public school him in for these jobs? >> there's none. 2020 there's 10 million unfilled jobs in the trades. >> all blue classroom jobs? >> across the board. anybody that uses told jeer as the service industry goings ghost to china
worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti mission here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of entrenched poverty. many of these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national priorities for the rebuilding. that
. it calls for the end of the chronic inequalities in our education system. it promotes economic growth from free enterprise because nothing has done more to lift people everywhere out of poverty. of all people i have ever known, jack kemp did more to personify and personalize this message. every problem does not to support -- disappear from the workings of the free market alone. i would love to say if we just went on the gold standard, it would all be settled. [laughter] americans are compassionate people. there is a consensus in this country about our obligations to the most vulnerable. those obligations are beyond dispute. the real debate is how best we can meet them. it is whether they are better met by private groups or government, voluntary action or government action. the truth is, there has to be a balance between the two. government must ask for the common good while leaving private groups free to do the work only they can do. there is a vast middle ground between the government and the individual. our families and our neighborhoods. the groups we joined and the places of worship. t
in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> in the movie "the eternal sunshine on the spotless mind," the characters use high tech to delete painful memories. too bad we can't do that, right? new research says he may be able to. wendy walsh is here. it's very interesting, wendy. this is out of western university. they were looking for better treatments for two things, posttraumatic stress disorder and drug addiction. why those two very different things? isn't a memory a memory? >> no, because those two disorders, if you will, both involve spontaneous memories. obtrusive memories that jump in for the person with posttraumatic stress disorder, it's painful memories that interject in what now may be seemingly a pleasant day. for drug addicts, it may be environmental triggers that trigger pleasurable memories of how great that drug was. they're looking for how to suppress those kinds of memories. >> it sounds like you would want it but it's also a little bit frightening because what if they block the wrong thing or cause some
education, published poems, journalism, and now this journalistic memoir. how do you -- you're now the most visible member of your generation of the family, of the generation before you, there's only one survivor, a woman not much involved in public life, how do you interpret your inherent? do you see yourself as a leader in some way? do you reflect on what your responsibilities are? how do you interpret your inherent? >> it's bad to think of it that way. it's that thinking that got us here in the first place. the idea that six letters of a last name somehow qualify anyone for leadership is dangerous and served pakistan dangerly, or, rather, it has not served pakistan so i never wanted, actually, for as long as i can remember, i wanted to be a writer, always. that -- or an actress or a swimmer. [laughter] my father was not pleased about the other two choices. i'm doing what i always thought i would be doing, what i always wanted to do, my heros growing up were always journalists, writers, and i think the notion of dynasty is one that has to be repudiated in my sense because we've seen what
education and training programs is still unclear, as the suggestions are only recommendations to eu member states. >> bayern face off against a byelorussian team tonight. >> boresoff beat them in november. bayern are in top form. >> as if they were not scoring enough goals already, goetze is ready to go. he is first choice again in the champions' league. bayern are looking to top the group with a victory. >> i am confident we will take the situation seriously and do our best to take first place so that we have the first leg in the next round away from home, which is a big advantage. >> badstuber will be missing after an injury. he will be replaced by another german international. that speaks volumes about their depth. as for their opponents, they were beaten by them 3-1. they are fired up, nonetheless. >> it is not every day you play against one of the biggest teams in the world. the team is excited. we want to show what we can do. >> it will not be a walk in the park for bayern, but it should give them a good workout, with tougher challenges ahead. >> we will be back with a look at transp
education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbor? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ (laughing) - hi, neighbor! we are in the vegetable garden at school. - hello, neighbor. come on, daniel, let's go pick some veggies! - vegetables! have you ever picked vegetables? i haven't. so i'm excited. here i come! look at our garden! what vegetables
for emergency contraception. joining me now is dr. laura burman a sex educator and a therapist and the host of in the bedroom on own. dr. burman, first of all, let me tell you i think this is probably one of the more outyaj just things i have seen this week. >> more than banning christmas. >> laura: i'm away from politics a lot this week. this? i have a young daughter and i think of a doctor telling a mom to leave the room so he can tell a young girl, maybe she is a christian girl, doesn't believe in this. her religion doesn't believe in this. telling the young girl well, if you have sex, can you use this morning after pill which includes things like dangers like thrombosis, pulmonary embolism. you can get a heart attack. you can have severe bleeding. retinal thrombosis. all sorts of hazards associated with taking that which is a big big big dose of hormones for young girls. how you can defend, this doctor? >> okay. well, first of all, i know this is a hot button topic. doctors are not telling girls if you have sex you can use this prescription. what the academy is recommending is that the
of chicago. that's how it happened. find those 10 people, educate them and maybe some good will come 20 years down the road. >> you mentioned the justice component of a lot of these islamist parties. there's an argument that can be made that this is a response to the corruption of these you sponsored regimes. i would say that in the case of gaza which you mentioned, rob, that was a very series component. any thoughts how to combat that or includes this in the right direction? >> for the record i'm against corruption. [laughter] , good, good, good. >> wanted to clear that up. yes, look. it goes back to the point i thought it made in my remarks that islamists didn't win and non-islamists lost, whether they were the former corrupt regimes or the divisions among the non-islamist parties today, they lose. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services. they lose by being so corrupt. they lose by being ossified. they lose, and i islamists are there like they been for eight years to take advantage of whatever opportunity, violence or through nonviolence. we didn't discuss their relationship with
of the men and women who served in world war ii by caring for this memorial and by educating our visitors about the importance of world war ii in american history. as the proud son of world war ii veteran, i am honored to be entrusted with this care. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, sir. ladies and gentlemen, it is my honor to introduce the chairman of the board of the friends of the national world war ii memorial, lieutenant-general mckiliter. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us as it -- as we commemorate the 71st anniversary of the attack on pearl harbor and the beginning of world war ii. we want to welcome our distinguished guests today, admiral james winnefeld, our keynote speaker. we are also honored to have with us general px kelly, chairman of the american battle monuments commission who played a role in establishing this special monument. [applause] it is always good to have superintendent bill vogel, our cost for this to work together. also the director of the bell "honor flight" -- the film "honor flight." there are many other distinguished guests to give a
accessible for people to have education. >> getting tested regularly also using condoms every day you engage in sexual activity. and having open communication with your sexual partner or partners. >> the health center offers hiv testing every day by oral swab or blood test. it costs $14. back to you guy s. >>> finals are around the corner. we'll tell you how students are preparing. >> the salvation army has a special holiday gift for the homeless. first we'll hear about what students have planned for winter break. we're throwing a concert here on campus called the triple ho show." "i am unfortunately going to be working." >> basically spend time with family and friends and work. we're throwing a concert here on campus. >> i am unfortunately going to be working. >> i'm going to be on vacation, having fun! snowboarding. >> chilling at home working and that's pretty much it. >> probably just going to go home and chill with my family. and work also. >> over winter break i'm going to be working. but i also hope to be able to get up to lake tahoe to try to snowboard. i'm actually graduating this
with. and in health, education, on and on and on. about 25 things. it's shocking really. .. start with john adams and then over to dan and anna woman ratepayer. [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> this is a similar question from a more pointed direction. you now, i think one of the things the labor movement notices is that it's possible to characterize what's gone on in terms of the living standards, working people in america as great promise of the last generation. if you twist your data a certain way. a lot of our people afford a lot larger tv than in 1970. people don't steal tvs as much as they used to because they're so cheap now. [inaudible] last night are not made in america anymore like they used to be. but in actuality, the things most important is which your book is about trying to capture. the most important in people's lives in terms of family retirement security, health care, access to education have all become much more difficult for working people to obtain. and the quality of life -- the quality of life is great pressure and has been for a long time.
shot by the taliban. she was shot at her home in pakistan after campaigning for girl's education. pakistan's president has added his signature to her petition. and hospital officials say that malala is doing quite well. >>> the rapper made famous by his gangnam style dance is apologizing. psy says hess sorry for making anti-american statements at a 2004 performance. the performer says the song lyrics were reactions to the war in iraq and the killing of two korean schoolgirls run over by a u.s. tank. he is scheduled to tape a christmas in washington special tomorrow. >>> a wrong turn leaves a california woman clinging for her life. she was on a routine hike through griffith park when she made one wrong turn. the trail slowly narrowed until the ground beneath her started to crumble. she clung to some vegetation on the trail to keep from falling off on the side. hikers along the correct trail heard her cries for help and called police. >> thank god i'm still alive. i was about to die. >> lucky woman there. crews rescued her by helicopter. she w
be used in art education. a good artist can use that digital pen to create something and someone else can come along and make it on their own. >> i understand that you have another invention that could make us look cool. >> i do. so you know on scooby-doo how the bad guys had the eyes that would follow you. a nasa engineer created a wait for this to be possible. he takes a cool portrait. cuts out the eyes. puts anfá ios device behind it d uses another ios device to facetime that one so he can see what's going on. >> this is the coolest security device ever. you can watch the burglars in they're in your house. >> you can recreate this without using facetime and download a free app of his called digital duds which give you moving eyes without putting your own in there. >> look at that. creeping me out there for a fás. >> food for louie. don't know him? you will after this. >> see what the king of gag worthy eating puts down this time. >> it's like a gusher. ♪ because we know how much you do to make the holidays just right. from ornaments to ottomans, memories are made with ikea. - well,
to determine the best education treatment and care for their disabled children. proponents of the treaty will dismiss those concerns as myth. i simply cannot support a treaty that threatens the right of parents to raise their children with the constantly made for a state interference. if this vote in this treaty were in fact about protecting the rights of americans with disabilities, i might have a different position in the debate would take on a very different tone. this treaty is ultimately not about protecting rights of americans with disabilities because this treaty simply has no enforcement mechanism to protect those rights, the rights of disabled americans including veterans who may travel the country such as china or russia or mali or any other country that may choose to adopt this treaty. if the senate desires to protect rights of disabled americans who travel abroad, the senate would do better to encourage other nations to model their own reforms, their own internal legal structures after the americans with disabilities act, which 20 years after its passage still send a message
with the education of little kids teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions for this to work, and it can't happen overnight. so as i said, part of the problem is they've created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> you expressed some pessimism or realism about what's likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops that'll be back, essentially, to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that which is islamist, which is semi-democratic but with the emphasis on the semi and, of course, is nuclear armed? >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. and i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them, there will be circumstances where some nuance and potential compromise is required, then you approach all of these problems that way. if you have very good intell
, fundamental rights of parents to direct the education and the upbringing of their child with h special needs. this could result in forcibly transferring a disabled child from the home to government-run schools if these unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats deem it necessary, even if the senate puts reservations into this treaty." i ask that this letter -- i have two letters i'd ask that would be made a part of the record at this point. that is one of the other once coming from the concerned women of america. i ask that they be made a part of the record at this point in the journal. ferraro ithe presiding officer:s there objection? without objection. mr. inhofe: i have been an advocate of human rights around the world, ensuring that the world is accessible to those with disabilities. however, i do not support the cumbersome regulations and potentially overzealous international organizations with anti-american biases that inch - that infringe upon american society. you know, if we had not passed what i consider to be the gold standard of the disabled world when we passed -- and i do remember at
is education, and how to make higher education cheaper. how to reform programs. what would be the number one thing that you would do that you can do as a freshman minority senator? >> well, i don't think there's a number one thing, but a number of number one things, and we have to do them all. as a 21st century student, doesn't look like it. it's not just an 18-year-old that graduated high school. that still continues to be a significant part of the folks that are going into college, but it's also the 38-year-old who decided to go back to school to get a degree. that was my sister's experience. it's also the 25-year-old after ten years after being out of high school is stuck in service jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves with new skills. the great news is that technology advances are going to not only lower the time and cost of getting that kind of skill acquisition, but will make it, you know, much more accessible, and with we have to ensure our student aid programs are not in the way of it. right now, we have a student aid program, the pelle grants or the loan programs, they
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. get selsun blue for itchy dry scalp. strong itch-fighters target scalp itch while 5 moisturizers leave hair healthy. selsun blue. got a clue? get the blue. >>> good morning, new york city. glad you're with us this morning for "early start weekend." very early. still a very dark morning there in the big apple. dplad you're watching. >>> this morning, former president george h.w. bush remains in stable condition in a houston hospital. he's been treated for bronchitis. he's been if the hospital for more than a week now. at 88, the world war ii veteran is the oldest living former president. >>> the supreme court could decide this week whether to take up the controversial issue of same-sex marriage. the nine justices met behind closed doors on friday but took no action. the high court could act tomorrow when it's scheduled to release orders, or the justices may choose to discuss the issue when they meet for another scheduled conference on friday. >>>
schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. >> three years ago, bobby dixon was in a life threatening motorcycle accident. it was so bad when medics arrived they did not think he would survive the ambulance ride. his father robert was all the way in shanghai, china on a business trip when he got word and flew immediately back to the u.s. and when he arrived. bob
build up credibility in the workplace. you are saying public school education should teach some of these kids how to do these. >> 25 years ago they did. >> they bought into the philosophy everybody has to go to college. not true. somebody has to build the college. somebody had to build the ceiling before michael angelo. >> we used to go to shop. used to call it shop. >> the unemployment rate is 4.5 percent for this country. there is something said for getting educated because you will work. it used tock the master and the apprentice. you worked your way up. everybody out there knows if you got to get a plumber that's 25 bucks an hour. >> the faucet leaks you are not calling the geek squad. >> there's not enough training the public system. >> by 2020 there's going to be 10 million unfilled jobs in the skilled trade. >> all blue collar jobs? >> right across the board. anybody that uses tools. >> as the service industry goes to china and honduras the replacement should be skilled blue collar people who can fix things auto mechanic. computer guys learn how to fix your computer. >> t
education impacted, for example, in south dakota. so these governors are very concerned about what these numbers could mean for them if lawmakers here in washington do not get a deal done. it's very real. you could see everything from defense to education impacted if a deal isn't done. >> all right, dan lothian, thank you. i like that governor fallin mentioned they have ideas to save money and create efficiencies. perhaps it's the governors to the rescue in this fiscal cliff crisis.lothian, thanks so much that. ose. citracal slow release. now's a good time to think about your options. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs? and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs every year. call today to request a free decision guide. the rescue in th
, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. he's going to apply testosterone to his underarm. axiron, the only underarm treatment for low t, can restore testosterone levels back to normal in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sperm count; ankle, feet, or body swelling; enlarged or painful breasts; problems breathing while sleeping; and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include
on drugs, they say look, we spend more on drug education and treatment than they do on law enforcement. what could they do better? >> what they could do better is simply stop locking people up. if you are sent to prison, you end up in far worse state than if you were actually sent to a drug rehabilitation center and helped. >> you're known as such a free spirit, right? do you smoke marijuana? >> i'm a '60s lad. i tried a split or two when i was a teenager. i decided that drink was my drug of choice, and so i prefer white wine or beer to marijuana, but you know, whether children of mine do, we'll, that's another story. >> i'm sure, right, they're in the age where i suppose it can be. all right, well, thank you very much. really appreciate your time. >> cheers, thank you. >> pretty interesting and serious topic, although he did say afterwards that he would want to try pot brownies. breaking the taboo will be able on youtube this evening and his opinion is on cnn.com/opinion right now and it is amazing. some of the statistics are unforgettable. >>> up next, mohammed morsi addresses suppor
that are guesswork, conjecture, educated guesswork to be sure, but still, they're conjecture. it's not like a court of law where you say this is the evidence, this is irrefutable proof. on the other hand there are certain things that the intelligence community can do. for example, they can assess how stockpiles were accumulated in a particular country. you mentioned that the russians had supplied some chemical agents to the syrians and that's absolutely true. you can assess how each area supplies the syrians. you know what they've done, how they've done it and how often they do it. also you can have some intelligence sometimes from human sources that specifically outlines exactly, you know, how good the chemical weapons are, whether they'll be used, whether there's good training for it, what kind of training these people have and all of that is weighed in when they make their assessment. >> there are reports that the assad regime has loaded the chemical weapons onto missiles. you need to get between assad and the person that pushes the button on the missile. how do we know that? >> there are report
approach issues on appropriation like education and health care and building in infrastructure, rebuilding our schools, dealing with the environment, our perspective is absolutely essential. so you may have women in congress, a couple, but what really matters is to have women at the table so that our perspectives, our lifetime of experience can be reflected in the work we do. >> you've been at the table for a while but your influence is obviously increasing. tell me where you stand on fiscal cliff. what's going to happen here, congresswoman? >> well, i am hoping because i'm the kind of person that always worked across the aisle. in fact on my foreign-ones committee, kay granger and i have been called the odd couple, we work well together. i've spoken to hal rodgers, chairman of the appropriations committee, i'm optimist being that we can sit at the table and get these things done. comprehensive tax reform is going to take longer, but we can make sure that the middle class keeps its tax cuts. we can make sure we target some waste. you can have across-the-board cuts. we have to have a very c
next now at this voter have voted to raise taxes to support public education. among in attendance was a third year seoul sociology student. he seek what is most students want. more classes. he addressed panel which included the university president and vice president. he asked if the extra funds from pop 30 will give student what is they need most. >> 27 million-dollar deft deaf sit which is probably going lead to more class cuts, more sections being cut which will further impede students from garage weight on time. >> the president took time to answer many questions. but when asked about classes being safed he couldn't geoff a tentative answer. >> hope i will that means there will be more resources and we can hire more. >> the carrera cher this is a hope. >> the reality is he's probably going to be forced to cut more classes because he's not going -- not going to cut any administrative blow or any administration where i believe is one of the main thing this is a should be cut. >> on the subject of measure d which wages minimum twine $10 per ho
right hon. friend do everything he can to insure that education, health and social services work together to jointly commissioned services that will make sure the much welcome reforms in the children and families bill will be workable on the globe? >> my hon. friend makes a very important point. we do need to get away from the idea of government or even local government operating in sinos with different budgets in different departments not working together. i know representatives lyndon as he does, takes huge steps bringing agencies together and working together in the area of problem families and commend them for the work they do. >> whatever announcements the chancellor makes on pension taxes, and when the government came to power, $1.6 billion, the chancellor gives the sheet? >> we inherited a plan to raise four billion pounds from the wealthiest people in terms of taxes and raise that four billion pounds and my right hon. friend will make further announcements in a moment. >> robert smith. >> the northeast of scotland makes a major contribution to the u.k. economy through the
. much like we want to have universal access to education. and we got to work hard every day to make certain of two things. one, it's good quality. and, two, it's affordable. and in fact i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we're talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, diabetes, they have better outcomes than we do. so i think whatever it is you're delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always be self-critical to try to examine, are we doing it the right way, can we do it better, how can we make it work. but in the second thing, even if we say we don't want universal health care, somebody gets sick, most of the team they'll end up in a hospital and they'll get care. and the cost of that care is simply shifted onto everybody else who is paying insurance. like for instance if you have health care at work, about $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated car
categories. access to education and the impediments i faced in my own life to education and how impossible it would have been for us to go to college if there weren't pell grants and student loans. it's the social realities and social changes that have occurred. you can't separate economic well-being from their social well-being. there are many young kids in america that are growing up in difficult circumstances raised by heroic parent, a grandmother in substandard housing, poor nutrition and schools that are failing. those kids are going to struggle. they don't go to after-school activities because the paints can't afford the fees. can you succeed? there are parents out there doing amazing things and will be the first ones to tell you, it is hard, but we can't be the country we need to be if we don't address that. government can have a role but civil society has a bigger role and we should support that and we have to address that and recognize it and talk about it. and maybe we haven't talked enough about that. i don't think that's the way to appeal to minority voters, that's the way to i
by polar records, you keep going for it. in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. when we got married. i had three kids. and she became the full time mother of three. it was soccer, and ballet, and cheerleading, and baseball. those years were crazy. so, as we go into this next phase, you know, a big part of it for us is that there isn't anything on the schedule. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... w
alarming findings of a legislative committee study. >>> plus, a conversation with an education
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